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Welcome to Running Wild’s 2021 trail running program. We have put together a series of spectacular runs in some of Victoria’s best national parks. Our motto is great runs—great places—great people. We do not run “races” as such, we are about the trail running experience, enjoying the country, experiencing what nature has to offer—weather, terrain and your ability to push yourself and get to know your body and your limits, and the social experience.

That is what trail running and wild running is all about, however if you want to run fast and race, that’s fine too.

Before entering any of our events, please familiarise yourself with the Covid-19 Pre-Race Safety Protocols and Procedures.

Distances in our introductory events range from as little as 1 km in the Dinner Plain Mile High Trail Run and Baw Baw Snow Gum Run to 10 km in the Darby River Half Marathon and 10 km fun run  or a 14 km stage in the Alpine Challenge, 22 km in the Razorback Run or the Mt Buller Sky Run. We offer a full range of distances in our Mountain and Coastal runs from 22, 36, 44, 65 km all the way up to 100 km and 100 miles in the Alpine Challenge.

If you haven’t tried trail running before we offer some great introductory experiences. If you are a seasoned marathon runner or ultra runner but looking for new experiences these runs may inspire you to look at running with fresh eyes.

This plan has been developed using the International Trail Running Association guidelines for trail running events during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The following procedures will be implemented in all Running Wild events during the 2020/21 season in order to provide a higher level of safety to participants, volunteers and supporters.

Runners will be asked to carefully review their fitness given that events take place in remote locations. Runners must consider carefully the distance that they choose to enter and their training/ability to complete their chosen distance safely. During the pandemic runners are urged to adopt a conservative approach in order to reduce potential calls on limited first aid/rescue resources.

Given that events take place in remote locations, please consider carefully the distance that you choose to enter and your training/ability to complete that distance safely. During the pandemic we urge runners to adopt a conservative approach in order to reduce potential calls on limited first aid/rescue resources.

Runners/Volunteers/Support Crew cannot attend the event if they have:

  1. A fever of ≥38°C on the day of the event
  2. Had any signs or symptoms of Covid-19 in the past 14 days, such as a new continuous cough, fever, change/loss of taste/smell
  3. Been in contact with anyone who is sick (symptomatic) in the past 14 days
  4. Travelled within the past 14 days to any local, interstate or international location with widespread ongoing local Covid-19 transmission

Runners must ensure that any crew, supporters or others that they intend to bring to the event are also subject to these criteria.

High risk individuals should exercise caution in considering whether to attend the event

High Risk individuals include:

  1. Individuals with underlying medical conditions placing them at higher risk: moderate to severe asthmatics, diabetics, severe obesity (BMI > 40), any chronic liver, kidney or heart conditions and immunocompromised individuals or those who live with someone who is immune compromised
  2. Individuals aged 70+ years or those with an underlying health condition like lung or heart disease, diabetes or immune compromised

Runners and Support crew must disclose, prior to arrival, (by phone or email to the race director) if they currently have any cold or flu symptoms. If they have, they are not to attend the event and should be tested for Covid-19, they should self isolate as per DHHS guidelines. Also a reminder that if you have recently been in contact with anyone that has tested positive, you should be in self isolation.

At registration, briefings, pre- and post run all runners and support crew must maintain a physical distance of 1.5 m minimum.

Event Registration/Check in

  1. Participants will have their temperature scanned on arrival at registration before interacting with other volunteers/participants. Any runner demonstrating a temperature of 38.0°C or higher will be requested to self-isolate. At registration, runners must sterilise their hands using hand sanitiser and should continue to practice safe hand hygiene frequently, and particularly when coming into contact with communal surfaces or equipment. When coughing, please remember to do so into your arm or a tissue/handkerchief and immediately sanitise your hands.
  2. Registration will be held outdoors (where possible) with participants undertaking social distancing. Face masks must be worn if registration is held indoors.
  3. Contact details of runners and support crew will be checked/recorded.
  4. At registration runners must produce a small bottle of hand sanitiser and pressure snake bandage.
  5. Runners with pre-existing respiratory issues (eg. asthma) must bring and carry their own inhalers on course.
  6. Mandatory gear checks will be suspended and replaced by random gear checks at checkpoints and at the finish line.
  7. Event briefings will take place outdoors with participants practising social distancing and wearing face masks.
  8. All runners will have their temperature taken at registration. Any runner with a temperature of 38.0°c or higher on 2 consecutive measurements will not be permitted to commence the race and will be requested to immediately self-isolate.
  9. All tables are to be cleaned/wiped down with disinfectant prior to use.

Event Start/Finish

  1. Staggered starts will be implemented for all events with runners departing in waves with fastest runners going first.
  2. Runners must hand sanitise on entering the finishing area and at intermediate checkpoints.
  3. Runners will be required to keep a record of their timing and advise finishing line staff and then socially distance if remaining in the finishing area, after taking some refreshments.

Volunteers

  1. Volunteers must disclose, prior to arrival, (by phone or email to the race director) if they currently have any cold or flu symptoms. If they have, they are not to attend the event and should be tested for Covid-19, they should self isolate as per DHHS guidelines.
  2. Will have their temperature scanned on arrival at registration before interacting with other volunteers/participants. Any volunteer demonstrating a temperature of 38.0°C or higher will be requested to self-isolate.
  3. On arrival at registration, volunteers must sterilise their hands using hand sanitiser or soap/water, and should continue to practice safe hand hygiene frequently, and particularly when coming into contact with communal surfaces or equipment. When coughing, please remember to do so into your arm or a tissue/handkerchief and immediately sanitise your hands.
  4. Should wear face masks which should be changed every 3-4 hours or if they become moist or dirty. If needing to remove the mask, do not touch the front of the mask—remove the mask from the earpieces, and discard into a waste bin. Immediately perform a hand wash or sanitise after handling a mask.
  5. Must not handle runners packs and/or water bottles during the event.
  6. Volunteers at aid stations assisting with food services will be required to wear disposable gloves (provided by event organiser) when preparing and handling food. Do not touch your person, objects, or surfaces whilst wearing gloves for food preparation and service. If necessary, remove gloves to perform non-food related tasks, then put on a new pair of gloves to resume food preparation or service.

Volunteers will be required to check temperatures at registration and dispense food and water at aid stations.

Aid Stations

  1. Runners arriving at an aid station must use hand sanitiser.
  2. Runners are not to self serve food, volunteers will dispense food and water.
  3. Bulk food will be replaced by individually wrapped packs of chips, chocolates, sweets.
  4. Cut fruit will be replaced by individually pre-packaged fruit cups/spoons and where possible oranges, mandarins and bananas.
  5. Where provided, hot soup will be served by volunteers.
  6. Runners must dispose of rubbish in receptacles provided at checkpoints.

Runners/Support Crew

  1. Will have their temperature scanned and recorded on arrival at registration before interacting with other volunteers/participants. Any runner with a temperature of 38.0°C or higher on 2 consecutive measurements will not be permitted to commence the race and will be requested to immediately self-isolate.
  2. On arrival at registration runners must sterilise their hands using hand sanitiser or soap and water and should continue to practice safe hand hygiene frequently, and particularly when coming into contact with communal surfaces.
  3. Must maintain physical distancing (1.5 m) and if indoors, wear a face mask at registration, briefing, checkpoints, finish. Distancing should be greater on the course (see 4 below).
  4. Runners are encouraged to maintain a physical distance of 10 m where possible out on trail if following on single track. When passing, yell out to the runner in front and request an opportunity to pass. Following too closely in someones ‘slip stream’ increases the potential for droplet transmission. If running with a friend, running side by side will reduce potential for droplet transmission. Please watch this clip highlighting potential droplet transmission during exercise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTzjC5HATXg
  5. Must not spit, blow, snot onto the course whilst running, runners must use paper tissues/handkerchief and carry them out in snap lock bags. If needing to clear the throat/nose, step off the track, look behind to make sure the track is clear and water droplets will not impact anyone following.
  6. Must carry individual hand sanitiser and use it prior to arriving at an aid station/finish as well as using it before using toilet facilities, and immediately after exiting in addition to routine hand washing.
  7. Must fill their own water bottle
  8. Must NOT touch food, food containers, water containers—volunteers will assist.

The 2019 Mt Baw Baw 7, 4 and 1 km events on Sunday have been cancelled due to bushfires. The event HQ have been evacuated from the mountain today (Saturday)

Snake Bite - Mandatory Safety Equipment

Please watch this video to familiarise yourself with the bandaging procedure.

snake bandageWith changes in treatment we are now recommending that all runners purchase a SMART Snake Pressure bandage as these allow you to apply the correct pressure (when the rectangle is stretched to become a square, when applying the bandage and hence retard the spread of the venom through your system. It can be purchased following this link - RRP 19.95.

This article was written by Rob Timmings who runs a medical/nursing education business teaching nurses, doctors and paramedics. 3000 bites are reported annually,  300-500 hospitalisations, 2-3 deaths.

Average time to death is 12 hours. The urban myth that you are bitten in the yard and die before you can walk from your chook pen back to the house is a load of rubbish.

While not new, the management of snake bite (like a flood/fire evacuation plan or CPR) should be refreshed each season. Let’s start with a basic overview.
There are five genus of snakes that will harm us (seriously) - Browns, Blacks, Adders, Tigers and Taipans.
All snake venom is made up of huge proteins (like egg white). When bitten, a snake injects some venom into the meat of your limb (NOT into your blood). This venom cannot be absorbed into the blood stream from the bite site. It travels in a fluid transport system in your body called the lymphatic system (not the blood stream).

Now this fluid (lymph) is moved differently to blood. Your heart pumps blood around, so even when you are lying dead still, your blood still circulates around the body. Lymph fluid is different. It moves around with physical muscle movement like bending your arm or knees, wriggling fingers and toes, walking/exercise etc.
Now here is the thing. Lymph fluid becomes blood after these lymph vessels converge to form one of two large vessels (lymphatic trunks) which are connected to veins at the base of the neck.

Back to the snake bite site—when bitten, the venom has been injected into this lymph fluid (which makes up the bulk of the water in your tissues). The only way that the venom can get into your blood stream is to be moved from the bite site in the lymphatic vessels. The only way to do this is to physically move the limbs that were bitten. Stay still!!! Venom can’t move if the victim doesn’t move. Stay still!!

Treatment - In the 1980s a technique called Pressure immobilisation bandaging was developed to further retard venom movement. It completely stops venom /lymph transport toward the blood stream. A firm roll bandage is applied directly over the bite site (don’t wash the area).
Technique: Three steps: keep them still

  • Step 1: Apply a bandage over the bite site, to an area about 10 cm above and below the bite.
  • Step 2: Use another elastic roller bandage and apply a firm wrap from fingers/toes all the way to the armpit/groin. The bandage needs to be firm, but not so tight that it causes fingers or toes to turn purple or white. About the tension of a sprain bandage.
  • Step 3: Splint the limb so the patient can’t walk or bend the limb. Keep still!

Do nots:

  • Cut, incise or suck the venom.
  • EVER use a tourniquet.
  • Remove the shirt or pants—just bandage over the top of clothing.
  • Remember movement (like wriggling out of a shirt or pants) causes venom movement.
  • DO NOT try to catch, kill or identify the snake!!! This is important.

In hospital we NO LONGER NEED to know the type of snake. New Antivenom neutralises the venoms of all the 5 listed snake genus, so it doesn’t matter what snake bit the patient. Polyvalent is our one shot wonder, stocked in all hospitals, so most hospitals no longer stock specific Antivenins.

Australian snakes tend to have 3 main effects in differing degrees.

  1. Bleeding—internally and bruising.
  2. Muscles paralysed causing difficulty talking, moving & breathing.
  3. Pain, in some snakes severe muscle pain in the limb, and days later the bite site can break down forming a nasty wound.

Remember—stay still.
Rob Timmings
Kingston/Robe Health Advisor